Diplomatic Drop Out

It does the US no good to fake diplomacy on the world stage. It causes our enemies to say the president has a learning disability. Ivanka Trump playing secretary-of-state or first-lady without any credentials, and Donald Trump using the DMZ between North and South Korea to embrace a despot hurts our global standing, and that will hurt us nationally. Each day the world loses faith and trust in the United States of America, and each day authoritarians and those who trade in hate gain power.

Throughout the G20, Donald Trump has again embraced the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, MSB, who ordered the killing and dismemberment of a US resident and journalist. Donald Trump once again embraced Putin, who helped him hack and steal the 2016 US presidential elections. They subsequently conspired to obstruct justice and whitewash the crimes through intimidation, violence, and murder. Donald Trump then met Kim Jong Un at the DMZ in what can only be seen as consenting to a lesser power. Donald Trump didn’t even use his power and position and make Kim Jong Un come to him just as he didn’t do with the first two meetings.

Ivanka Trump playing first lady or secretary of state didn’t do the US any favors as well. The entire world knows she is there to lift her and her husbands brand. That same brand which has a lot of business in China with voting machines and Israeli real estate developments passed off as a Palestinian peace process. They know she represents the corrupted nature of the US government, and they see it all as decline. They know this represents the implosion of a hegemon and the ushering in of what might be multi-polar chaos. Those who support this regime openly seek that chaos. Those who seek consensus understand what happened the last time we fell into multi-polar chaos.

We’re crumbling inside because of ethnic nationalism and greedy corruption stealing natural and social resources. We’re crumbling inside because justice and truth are silenced and those who seek structural reform and reconciliation are ignored. We’re crumbling inside because we have a president hellbent on committing crimes against humanity to be ‘infamous’ rather than ‘famous.’ We’re crumbling outside our borders with economy killing trade wars and cooperation busting climate denial. The rhetoric Donald Trump uses can cause the middle-east to fall into a world war does us no good — the writings on the wall.

It’s visible but unseen by many just how far the US has slipped into tyranny. The world will play along and let Donald and Ivanka have their photo opportunities, but they are moving forward without us in every other way. They are moving forwards because policy and progress are not achieved with photo ops. The Trump regime is not governing; they are grifting and turned the United States into an authoritarian regime. We cannot always think of our exceptionalism and believe we’re immune to authoritarians and their chaos. The Trump family playing government looking nothing other than a despotic regime continues to erode the United States from the inside and out.

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Utilizing the Tools of Conflict Resolution and Reconstruction

Policymakers face increasing challenges when utilizing the tools of conflict resolution and post-conflict reconstruction. These devices are interconnected, however, since the end of the Cold War their connections have become critically important due to the overwhelming degree of intrastate conflict. This essay will explain conflict resolution and reconstruction as well as why conflict is notably internal post-Cold War. Understanding the connections between political, security and economic tools of resolution and reconstruction will aid in understanding how they are applied. As well, this essay will analyze the challenges actors come up against when using those tools in an attempt to resolve a conflict of notable intrastate dynamics.

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To Subsidize, Systemize, and Sustain Conflict in the DRC

Wars in the Democratic Republic of Congo

International involvement in the violent clashes the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has faced since the dwindling of the Cold-War can be summarized into three terms: subsidization, systemization, and sustainability of conflict. This essay will draw out in detail why the international ‘response’ to clashes in the DRC is anything but an intervention and more indicative of the creation and maintenance of a political economy of conflict surrounding natural resources. The principal mechanism of exchange shown in this economy will be resource theft and weapons smuggling, with rebels groups acting as proxies for foreign interests facilitating an ultimately self-defeating quasi-state security apparatus for traders. Understanding how this economy of conflict works is acutely relevant in predicting future relations in the DRC and progressing towards a lasting peace. It is worth noting the DRC arguably has never had non-violent elections, and a new round of presidential elections are coming up in November.

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Mapping Inequality: Uneven Development between States in the International System

Access to the ability to achieve an elevated sense of livelihood is uneven within the broad process of globalization. This is especially true in a more knowledge-based economy, which seems to be the current norm. Inequality of this kind is not only between nation-states, but for each and every one of us within our respective countries. Using alternative theories such as dependency theory, international political economy and geographical political economy, the dynamics of inequality will be highlighted and explored. Incorporating material pertaining to neoliberal theory, hegemony, regimes, and denationalization will show the discord surrounding the causal effects of uneven development. These theories, however, do not disprove developmental inequality but rather add depth and nuance to the argument. Focused emphasis in the regions of Latin America, and Southeast Asia – including China and Japan – will be used to build a case-study. These regions will illuminate how uneven development looks within international systems, and possible methods of reaching a more sustainable equilibrium.

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