Conscious Uncoupling: The Brexit

Today is a day of reflection. Today is a day to wonder what will come about tomorrow and the day after. What exactly does the United Kingdom leaving the European Union mean? Why do so many say this is the dawn of a new era? There is a lot that will be told and learned in the time to come. Right now the shock is achingly real making it worrisome to ponder predictions, besides the overall worrisome that comes with predictions. However, one cannot feel there is something to worry about in all this. While it might not be understood, the economics might fly over our head, and the politics are muddy, something still feels ominous about this new relation in the UK.

The age of disparity should be yesterday, but it is not. One cannot stand very firm with the notion the UK does not carry an unequal amount of global influence. It is entirely accurate to say that a sovereign nation much like people will follow the leader is an oversimplification. However, in this case, the proverb might ring quite true. Should we even worry about the precedent this sets up with other countries in the EU? Does this apply to those countries that are not in a union similar to the UK but rather still possess an environment where influence could be burdensome?

The answer is yes; we should worry about this on all fronts because of the influence the UK carries and the painfully critical times at hand. Deciding against cooperation might just be the spark numerous other disgruntled countries need to close their doors. We live in times where cooperation is decreasing globally and misconceptions and doubt reign supreme. A global power like the UK should not set an example of going at it alone. Going ‘Rogue’ could have sinister causalities that we do not see coming.

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One Step Forward and Two Steps Back: The 2007 Global Crisis and Our Future

Have the worst wounds of the crisis been avoided? We might have cauterized the injury with an infection still inside. To name a few: advanced economies, the European Union (EU) and emerging nations face dire economic imbalances; archaic geopolitical style maneuvering is occurring at rising rates in Eastern Europe while Africa and the Arab region are bleeding migrants in alarming numbers. Even if you do not add in a changing climate, these relations will not equal a description of ‘smooth sailing’ for global economics in the foreseeable future. At the very least, they show an expressed need to move away from crisis economics as a ‘new normal’ and return to the ability to use conventional Keynesian models of economics. If taken as critical, as they should be, there is a need for broad structural changes that would see new models of economics that temper global arrangements in exchange for a more powerful state.

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